Knowledge and use of edible mushrooms in two municipalities of the Sierra Tarahumara, Chihuahua, Mexico

Quiñónez Martínez, Miroslava y Ruan Soto, Felipe y Aguilar Moreno, Ivonne Estela y Garza Ocañas, Fortunato y Lebgue Keleng, Toutcha y Lavín Murcio, Pablo Antonio y Enríquez Anchondo, Irma Delia (2014) Knowledge and use of edible mushrooms in two municipalities of the Sierra Tarahumara, Chihuahua, Mexico. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 10 (1). p. 67. ISSN 1746-4269

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Background: The Sierra Madre Occidental of Chihuahua in Northern Mexico is inhabited by indigenous Raramuris, mestizos, and other ethnic groups. The territory consists of canyons and ravines with pine, oak and pine-oak forests in the higher plateaus. A great diversity of potentially edible mushrooms is found in forests of the Municipalities of Bocoyna and Urique. Their residents are the only consumers of wild mushrooms in the Northern Mexico; they have a long tradition of collecting and eating these during the “rainy season.” However, despite the wide diversity of edible mushrooms that grow in these areas, residents have a selective preference. This paper aims to record evidence of the knowledge and use of wild potentially edible mushroom species by inhabitants of towns in the Sierra Tarahumara of Chihuahua, Mexico. Method: Using a semi-structured technique, we surveyed 197 habitants from seven locations in Urique, Bocoyna, and the Cusarare area from 2010 to 2012. Known fungi, local nomenclature, species consumed, preparation methods, appreciation of taste, forms of preservation, criteria for differentiating toxic and edible fungi, other uses, economic aspects, and traditional teaching were recorded. To identify the recognized species, photographic stimuli of 22 local edible species and two toxic species were used. Results: The respondents reported preference for five species: Amanita rubescens, Agaricus campestris, Ustilago maydis, Hypomyces lactifluorum, and the Amanita caesarea complex. No apparent differences were found between ethnic groups in terms of preference, although mestizos used other species in Bocoyna (Boletus edulis and B. pinophilus). Some different uses of fungi are recognized by respondents, i.e. home decorations, medicine, as food in breeding rams, etc. Conclusion: The studied population shows a great appreciation towards five species, mainly the A. caesarea complex, and an apparent lack of knowledge of nearly 20 species which are used as food in other areas of Mexico. There are no apparent differences among Sierra inhabitants in terms of gender, occupation, or language regarding the recognition and consumption of species. The rejection of certain species is due mainly to fear of poisoning and the traditional selective teaching of families in the mountain communities of the Sierra Tarahumara.

Tipo de elemento: Article
Palabras claves no controlados: Wild edible mushrooms; Mestizos; Raramuris; Forest; Chihuahua
Materias: Q Ciencia > QK Botánica
S Agricultura > SD Ciencia forestal
Divisiones: Ciencias Forestales
Usuario depositante: Lic. Jesús E. Alvarado
Creadores:
CreadorEmailORCID
Quiñónez Martínez, MiroslavaNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Ruan Soto, FelipeNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Aguilar Moreno, Ivonne EstelaNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Garza Ocañas, FortunatoNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Lebgue Keleng, ToutchaNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Lavín Murcio, Pablo AntonioNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Enríquez Anchondo, Irma DeliaNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Fecha del depósito: 12 Abr 2019 19:01
Última modificación: 12 Abr 2019 19:01
URI: http://eprints.uanl.mx/id/eprint/15125

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