The Neovolcanic Axis Is a Barrier to Gene Flow among Aedes aegypti Populations in Mexico That Differ in Vector Competence for Dengue 2 Virus

Gubler, Duane J. y Lozano Fuentes, Saúl y Fernández Salas, Ildefonso y de Lourdes Munoz, Maria y García Rejón, Julián Everardo y Olson, Ken E. y Beaty, Barry J. y Black, William C. (2009) The Neovolcanic Axis Is a Barrier to Gene Flow among Aedes aegypti Populations in Mexico That Differ in Vector Competence for Dengue 2 Virus. PloS Neglected tropical diseases, 3 (6). e468. ISSN 1935-2727

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Resumen

Background: Aedes aegypti is the main mosquito vector of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV). Previous population genetic and vector competence studies have demonstrated substantial genetic structure and major differences in the ability to transmit dengue viruses in Ae. aegypti populations in Mexico. Methodology/Principal Findings: Population genetic studies revealed that the intersection of the Neovolcanic axis (NVA) with the Gulf of Mexico coast in the state of Veracruz acts as a discrete barrier to gene flow among Ae. aegypti populations north and south of the NVA. The mosquito populations north and south of the NVA also differed in their vector competence (VC) for dengue serotype 2 virus (DENV2). The average VC rate for Ae. aegypti mosquitoes from populations from north of the NVA was 0.55; in contrast the average VC rate for mosquitoes from populations from south of the NVA was 0.20. Most of this variation was attributable to a midgut infection and escape barriers. In Ae. aegypti north of the NVA 21.5% failed to develop midgut infections and 30.3% of those with an infected midgut failed to develop a disseminated infection. In contrast, south of the NVA 45.2% failed to develop midgut infections and 62.8% of those with an infected midgut failed to develop a disseminated infection. Conclusions: Barriers to gene flow in vector populations may also impact the frequency of genes that condition continuous and epidemiologically relevant traits such as vector competence. Further studies are warranted to determine why the NVA is a barrier to gene flow and to determine whether the differences in vector competence seen north and south of the NVA are stable and epidemiologically significant.

Tipo de elemento: Article
Divisiones: Ciencias Biológicas
Usuario depositante: Lic. Josimar Pulido
Creadores:
CreadorEmailORCID
Gubler, Duane J.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Lozano Fuentes, SaúlNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Fernández Salas, Ildefonsoifernand1@hotmail.comNO ESPECIFICADO
de Lourdes Munoz, MariaNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
García Rejón, Julián EverardoNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Olson, Ken E.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Beaty, Barry J.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Black, William C.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Fecha del depósito: 29 Abr 2019 18:41
Última modificación: 05 Mar 2020 22:51
URI: http://eprints.uanl.mx/id/eprint/15100

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