Identification of human semiochemicals attractive to the major vectors of onchocerciasis

Young, Ryan M. y Burkett Cadena, Nathan D. y McGaha, Tommy W. y Rodríguez Pérez, Mario Alberto y Toé, Laurent D. y Adeleke, Monsuru A. y Sanfo, Moussa y Soungalo, Traore y Katholi, Charles R. y Noblet, Raymond y Fadamiro, Henry y Torres Estrada, José Luis y Salinas Carmona, Mario César y Baker, Bill y Unnasch, Thomas R. y Cupp, Eddie W. (2015) Identification of human semiochemicals attractive to the major vectors of onchocerciasis. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 9 (1). e3450. ISSN 1935-2735

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Background: Entomological indicators are considered key metrics to document the interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus, the etiological agent of human onchocerciasis. Human landing collection is the standard employed for collection of the vectors for this parasite. Recent studies reported the development of traps that have the potential for replacing humans for surveillance of O. volvulus in the vector population. However, the key chemical components of human odor that are attractive to vector black flies have not been identified. Methodology/Principal Findings: Human sweat compounds were analyzed using GC-MS analysis and compounds common to three individuals identified. These common compounds, with others previously identified as attractive to other hematophagous arthropods were evaluated for their ability to stimulate and attract the major onchocerciasis vectors in Africa (Simulium damnosum sensu lato) and Latin America (Simulium ochraceum s. l.) using electroantennography and a Y tube binary choice assay. Medium chain length carboxylic acids and aldehydes were neurostimulatory for S. damnosum s.l. while S. ochraceum s.l. was stimulated by short chain aliphatic alcohols and aldehydes. Both species were attracted to ammonium bicarbonate and acetophenone. The compounds were shown to be attractive to the relevant vector species in field studies, when incorporated into a formulation that permitted a continuous release of the compound over time and used in concert with previously developed trap platforms. Conclusions/Significance: The identification of compounds attractive to the major vectors of O. volvulus will permit the development of optimized traps. Such traps may replace the use of human vector collectors for monitoring the effectiveness of onchocerciasis elimination programs and could find use as a contributing component in an integratedvector control/drug program aimed at eliminating river blindness in Africa.

Tipo de elemento: Article
Materias: CONACYT > Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud
R Medicina > RA Aspectos Públicos de la Medicina
Divisiones: Medicina
Usuario depositante: Lic. Jesús E. Alvarado
Creadores:
CreadorEmailORCID
Young, Ryan M.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Burkett Cadena, Nathan D.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
McGaha, Tommy W.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Rodríguez Pérez, Mario AlbertoNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Toé, Laurent D.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Adeleke, Monsuru A.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Sanfo, MoussaNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Soungalo, TraoreNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Katholi, Charles R.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Noblet, RaymondNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Fadamiro, HenryNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Torres Estrada, José LuisNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Salinas Carmona, Mario Césarmsalinas@hu.uanl.mxNO ESPECIFICADO
Baker, BillNO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Unnasch, Thomas R.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Cupp, Eddie W.NO ESPECIFICADONO ESPECIFICADO
Fecha del depósito: 08 Abr 2019 21:11
Última modificación: 08 Abr 2019 21:11
URI: http://eprints.uanl.mx/id/eprint/15120

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